Educause Conference 2011

Yesterday I posted details on how to follow along to the Tools of Change in Publishing conference hosted by O’Reilly Media.  Books + technology is their focus.

Well, I realized last night that there is another conference I wish to keep my eye on – Educause.  This group is about Education + technology.

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology.

In my professional work I try to keep up with what is going on with Educause as I do have a strong education component to what I do.  However, if you are a genealogist with education responsibilities, you may be interested in this event also.

Keynote speakers look interesting.  There’s even a BYU person represented, and a Google exec.

How to follow along?

  • Twitter hash tag is #eli2011.  Add it to your Twitter saved searches
  • Educause Facebook page – “Like” them and it will show up in your news feed
  • Online Meeting – they offer a formal online package, but it is rather expensive.  Almost $800 if you’re not a member! It does not seem like you can follow along online otherwise.
  • Second Life — ultimate coolness here! You can listen to the speakers online in Second Life via the University of Wisconsin at Milwaulkee’s SL site.  Though I have to work, I will try to venture in during my lunch break and see what’s going on.

As an interesting aside, check out their 7 Thing series. Each of these publications are available in ePub formats so can be added to ebook devices such as the Nook & iPad (sorry — Kindle does not do ePub).

Do you see a trend here with me???  :-)  In any case, if you are a genealogy educator, you may wish to check it out!

RootsTech Talking

Here is a snapshot of all of our RootsTech Twitter activity the past 7 days.   Almost 3500 tweets from 334 contributors.  494 tweets/day.  That’s a lot of talking people!  The peak was on Saturday, the last day.

But think about it. There were 3000+ attendees and only 10% on Twitter.  Imagine what it would be like if more were on Twitter. Oh my!

For a tweet-by-tweet transcript from Feb. 10-Feb 13th, you can access it here.   Want to do a custom report? Go to wthashtag.org/rootstech and put in your dates of interest.

Tools of Change in Publishing Conference

Over the weekend, many of us were busy online tweeting & blogging about (as well as following along) to all the events at RootsTech.  I personally spent hours reading about all the great things going on.

On Tuesday, another conference starts that some of my geneabuddies & library friends may be interested in – the Tools of Change for Publishing Conference.

Sponsored by O’Reilly, the conference explores the latest and greatest in publishing.  Topics will span books in print, ebooks, cloud computing, online services such as GoodReads  & LibraryThing and more.  Books + Technology is the name of this game.

This is the 5th annual conference and will be held February 14th-16th in New York.  How can you at home follow along?

  • Live streams of the keynotes – 13 presentations!! the speeches run from 8:45am-6pm. Best of all, all of them will be made available via YouTube or podcast subscription for later viewing.  Since I work full-time, I’ll be making use of the YouTube accessibility.  I am particularly interested in a talk on eReading Survey results and another on creating apps.  Video from the 2010 conference is also available online.
  • TOC Twitter account – the official Twitter feed for the conference
  • The Twitter hashtag — is #toccon.  Of course I’ve already added this to my list of saved searches. You should too.
  • TOC Facebook Page – “Like” it to get updates in your news feed
  • TOC Social Page – consolidates the social activity around the ‘net.

This is a conference from the publishing industry so there will be that “bent”, but overall it will still be fun & informational to follow along with this conference.   As I draw inferences for both my professional position as well as my genealogy hobby I’ll share as appropriate.  Who else is with me?  :-)

Flipboard for Genealogy

Do you have an iPad? Do you use Flipboard? If not, you are missing out!  Flipboard turns content from various resources from basic streams into a visual smorgasbord.

Today, I realized I should add a section on my Flipboard for showing my @taneya/genealogy list I have through Twitter.  How cool is this?

Browsing is as simple as turning the pages :-)   For more info on Flipboard, visit their site.

Happy Blogiversary To Me!

Today my genealogy blog is 5 years old.

Wow! My first post on the blog was not lengthy, but in it, I hypothesized that I’d use this blog to “document what I learn as I research my family’s genealogy.”  That has certainly turned out to be the case too.  While I initially was not sure I needed to start another blog,  since I’d already maintained a personal website for 6 years,  it was a wise decision.  Not everyone shares my obsession :-)

After that initial post, a few weeks went by before I posted again, but those early weeks had me absolutely hooked into genealogy.  I ordered many certificates, joined Ancestry, connected with family members, and also started reading other genealogy blogs.  One of the first bloggers I interacted with, Nita, is no longer blogging about her family genealogy it seems, but we shared the Koonce surname among our family trees.

In the past 5 years I have continued to blog about my family tree, but have expanded to trees of my friends and postings on various aspects in the geneasphere that capture my interest – namely, genealogy 2.0, technology, and in accordance with my information science background – information resources.

Here’s to many more years of geneablogging!

Finding Dwight Hillis Wilson

Last night while browsing through my RSS feeds I happened across a blog post on the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society News website requesting help in finding a photo of David Hillis Wilson.  David Hillis Wilson (1909-1962), a native of Raleigh,  NC , was a former archivist at Fisk University (here in my city of Nashville, Tennessee), a professor at Morris Brown College in Atlanta, and also worked as an archivist at the Allied Force Records Administration.

The librarian and genealogist that I am, I quickly started looking to see what information I could find.  Mr. Wilson’s obituary provides further details of his life, including that he attended Shaw University in Raleigh.   Noting this, I thought to perhaps look for Shaw University yearbooks.  I sent a couple of emails out, but then again, it was late Saturday night — I knew I’d not hear anything until Monday at the earliest.   My next thought then was to look for family members; that’s what genealogists do right?

15 minutes later I had a telephone number for Mr. Wilson’s son! I called him today and he says that he can indeed provide a photo of his father to the group! Is that not excellent or what!  I am looking forward to seeing how this develops!

The Husband Knows

Last night,  my husband and I were watching Roots: The Next Generations. We watch this periodically and each time I watch it, I do some online searching to add to the tree I’m building for Alex Haley’s family.  It’s just a curiosity I have.

One storyline that fascinates my husband is that of the interracial couple portrayed in the mini-series.  In the show, Jim Warner, the son of an established Henning County, TN citizen, Colonel Warner, becomes interested in a black school teacher, Carrie.  Carrie is said to have been a member of the 2nd graduating class of Fisk University (here in my home city of Nashville) and Jim and she eventually marry.  Jim is subsequently outcast by his father, who declares him to be treated as a black man by all white citizens of the county.  Jim and Carrie have a child, who grows up to be a doctor.  My husband is particularly interested in knowing more about this doctor.

In my quest to learn more about Jim and Carrie and try to find them in the records, I was not sure where to start.  In the mini-series, many of the last names of the people were changed from the book, and the events in this follow-up mini-series were not even completely covered in the book Roots. I consulted our hard copy of Roots and also saw that Carrie is described as having graduated from Lane College, not Fisk.   With these type of alterations to the facts, I was unsure how to really search.  As I tried several strategies in vain,  my husband said, “what about searching for mulatto children? Does the database let you do that?”

At first, I didn’t think that would work. Surely there would be many mulatto children right? But I did search the 1880 census using that criteria and sure enough, there were only 5 results for Lauderdale County, TN.   The first three I quickly discounted given the age.  The fourth one I did go ahead and look at the original census record, but it was an indexing mistake; the person in question while indexed as mulatto was enumerated as black.  The 5th one was more interesting however.

Jas could be short for James; and Jim, the name used in the miniseries is also short for James. The wife here is named Carrie.  The surname Turner is also not too far off from Warner.  Is this the family? I go to look at the census record.  I open the page and before I get to the Turner family I see someone familiar.  Alex Haley’s 2nd-great grandfather, Chicken George! (George Lea was his name).

And soon after him on the page is the Turner couple. Jas. B. is enumerated as Mulatto, Carrie is black and is a Schoolteacher by occupation. They have two children, a son and a daughter, also enumerated as black.   Now, I am pretty sure this is the family in the mini-series!  Perhaps the Mulatto enumeration for Jas. stems from how his family outcast him?   I’ll be continuing my search to see if I can further verify if this is indeed the couple and to see if I can find out more information about this James’ parents.  I do know that there was a prominent white Hardin Turner in the county and James has named his son Hardin.

I am pretty sure it is them though. I located Jim & Carrie in the 1900 and 1910 census records of Lauderdale County.  In 1910, their son Hardin is listed as Hardin A. In 1910, I found Hardin Alexander Turner, born about the right time in Tennessee, living in Ouachita County, Arkansas and is a doctor! A check of the 1912 Catalog of Meharry Medical College (also here in Nashville) and I find he graduated from there in 1906.

I’m trying to locate more about this family and the search continues.  Just think, all this due to a search suggestion from the hubby.   He rocks  :-)

Saturday Night Wiki Fest

Over the past few months I have been contributing to FamilySearch’s Research Wiki.  In August I did a post describing my overall & positive impressions of the site.  Essentially, it could become the Wikipedia for Genealogy if enough of us contribute to it.  FamilySearch already has an impressive number of volunteers contributing to the Indexing initiative and it would be nice to see momentum gather around the Wiki.

The Wiki team has pursued collaborations with genealogy projects and societies as one method to increase contributions.  It is in these efforts that I’ve been involved,  for all three of the state USGenWeb projects in which I participate have “adopted” the corresponding wiki sites.   The TNGenWeb, NCGenWeb and FLGenWeb have all signed on to help add resources and information.

The Wiki is easy to add to – very much “what you see is what you get” with the option to add using wiki code if you’re comfortable with that syntax.  Tonight, I focused on adding links to the North Carolina counties I either host or am temporarily taking care of – Craven,  Jones, Lenoir,  Martin,  Onslow, Wake, and Washington.  A friend of mine sent me a template she uses for county sites and after viewing it, I created an outline for myself.  Though not as easy to use as a “template,” with my outline I can get a bare bones page up in less than 30 minutes.  The pages can always be enhanced, but at least if someone lands on them it won’t be blank :-).

If you have knowledge to share about any genealogy resources, consider adding to the Wiki.  Registration is easy and you’ll be going in no time at all.  I am trying to condition myself to use it as my own personal research tool – adding links to resources as I come across them from the appropriate page. So far, there’s only one drawback — I can’t seem to login with Google Chrome and need to use Firefox instead.  Hopefully they’ll fix that issue soon!