My DNA quest begins!

I have previously posted about my husband’s McClellan ancestry and how I wish to do DNA tests to see if there is any match with the white McClellans.  To this end, today, I finally ordered the DNA kit from FamilyTree DNA and the kit will be shipped by week’s end! I’m so excited. To test the proper male descendancy, we are going to test a cousin of my husband’s. I chose the Y25 marker test as a starter. It wasn’t too expensive (especially with the surname group discounts/coupons) and I figured it was a good starting point for the number of generations I’m looking at.  I’ll post more as my experience continues. Now, I need to really do some bona fide DNA genealogy testing research!

New for 2008 – My Genealogy Activities Synopsis

In the spirit of The Geneaholic, I’ve decided to keep a short list of my genealogy activities. Sometimes, the fruits of my work end up posted to the blog, but more often than not, I’ll find that I spend time working on something and not post about it. Also, I think it would be helpful for me to have a month-by-month breakdown of what I’ve worked on genealogically, in addition to my more in-depth blog posts. So, in that vein, I’m starting a series of posts title Genealogy Activities Synopsis.

New Books!

I’ve got some new books over the past few days to add to my genealogy/history library. As my interest in genealogy has given me a new zeal for history information in general, I love to look for historical books. We are visiting my parents in Greensboro, NC and since I did live here for years growing up as a child, I’m going to also start reading to familiarize myself with some of the history of Greensboro. My new books include:

Time to schedule myself?

The past few days I have been occupying my time by working on several of my genealogy projects. Most notably, I continued to work on the Merry genealogy and then I’ve also added some content to my blog I keep for a newspaper of Plymouth, Washington County, NC. In light of this, I think I may have to brainstorm about how to rotate my time among all my projects so that I “touch” them more frequently and more systematically. Let me start by making a list…

Genealogies

  • My own genealogy
  • Kalonji’s genealogy
  • Waddell genealogy
  • Walden genealogy
  • Clancy genealogy
  • Lee genealogy
  • Walker genealogy
  • Fry (white) genealogy
  • McClellan (white) genealogy
  • Orick genealogy
  • Davis genealogy
  • Roberson genealogy
  • WF’s genealogy
  • MacNair (white) genealogy
  • Wimberly (white) genealogy
  • Koonce (white) genealogy
  • My stepmother’s tree

Projects

  • Blount County TNGenWeb site
  • Roanoke Beacon Index/Blog
  • Kinston Free Press Index/Blog – of Lenoir County, NC
  • Talladega Daily Mountain Home Blog – of Talladega, Alabama
  • Nashville Black History & Genealogy Blog

Now that I list it out like this, it doesn’t seem to bad… however, I feel that some of my projects get neglected. So, here’s to me being more conscience and planning out my time distribution a little more evenly. :-)

This must be the week of the Merrys!

This must really be the week of the Merrys because I had another great find today!  I received a notice in my email today that the Nashville Public Library posted an online index to a listing of more than 19,000 names of people buried in the Old Nashville Cemetery. The listings are drawn from a series of internment books held by the Metro Nashville Archives, 1846-1949. So, I decide to take a look and guess what I find – more Merrys.

It is difficult to be precisely sure of all the exact relationships, but I think it lists another four children of Nelson & his wife Mary, in addition to his mother.  Also, there are some other Merrys that I think may be related as they are buried in Nelson’s plot. I am confused though on precise locations, because, I have been to Nelson’s grave and it is not in the Old Cemetery, but it is listed in this database. I may have to call the Metro Archives or go see the books in person to understand more about locations.  Mt. Ararat, where Nelson is buried, does have an affiliation with the City Cemetery, but I think there is an issue with naming.  But to summarize who is listed in this database…

  • Clancy Cousins – died at age 18, 11 Mar 1850. States that she is free colored female, and sister of Nelson Merry, who is also noted as free. Her cause of death was Fever. It is correct that Nelson was free.
  • Merry, infant boy – died 14 Jan 1851. States that he is the son on “N. Merry” and died of Croope. Now, this could be either Nelson’s son, or a son of his brother, Napoleon.
  • Merry, infant girl – died 6 Oct 1854. States that she is the “daughter of Nelson Merry” who is a free colored man.
  • Merry, infant boy – died 12 Jan 1857. States that he is the son of “Ann Merry” who is a free colored woman. This may or may not be Nelson’s son. His wife Mary’s middle name was Ann, so it could be that her middle name was used in this instance, or the infant’s mother could be a different person all together.
  • Merry, Mrs. Sidney – died 26 Jun 1873. The only note on this one is box paid on Nelson Merry’s lot. This is Nelson’s mother!  From census records, I know that Sidney lived with Nelson in 1870, but she was no longer there in 1880. In the 1870 census, she is listed as being 80 years old, but in the 1850 census she is also listed as being 80. So, given the 1850 census date, I had already estimated her year of birth to be about 1770. This cemetery listing matches that and if she died in 1873, that would make her just around 100 years old! I can’t wait to go search for an obituary.

Now, these dates may be actually burial dates and not dates of death – I need to check that in the source books. But, in addition to these whom I think the relationship is clear, there are others:

  • Two infant children of a Jas. Hoss (or Sloss) that are on the lot paid by “N. Merry”
  • A 100 year old woman named Angeline Thomas that is on the lot paid by “N. Merry.” Her date is 24 Jan 1872.
  • A 29 year old man named William King who is listed with Sidney Merry and is also in “box paid by Nelson G. Merry”
  • An infant boy listed as the son of George Merry, who is listed as free colored man.
  • An infant boy listed as the son of a Francis Merry
  • Merry, Mary – died in 1855. The listing just says “Nelson Merry’s lot.”  She was 10 years old. I’m not sure who she is because in 1850, Nelson & Mary are only listed with one child, John Wesley Merry.

All of this gives me reason to really go back and research other Merrys in I can find them. How intriguing!  Now, the fun is not over. I decided to visit the website of the city cemetery and was happy to see that they are very involved in genealogical causes. They have posted a list of people buried in the cemetery whose descendants have contacted the cemetery, and they have a volunteer looking up obituaries of people buried there and they are providing links to those obits. Very progressive! If only more cemeteries would do this!

NYPL Digital Images

In my blog reading this evening, I re-read a post describing the New York Public Library’s Digital Images database. Wonderful site! I just did a few random searches and located some cool pictures.This is a picture of Dr. Robert F. Boyd. In a visit to a cemetery in the area a few months ago, I’d taken a picture of his tombstone and recognized the name from some of my Nashville Globe newspaper reading. In finding this photo however, I am just now realizing that he was a professor at Meharry Medical College. This is a very nice picture of him and was published in the book

Gibson, J. W., and W. H. Crogman. Progress of a Race; Or, The Remarkable Advancement of the American Negro; from the Bondage of Slavery, Ignorance, and Poverty, to the Freedom of Citizenship, Intelligence, Affluence, Honor, and Trust. Miami, Fla: Mnemosyne Pub. Inc, 1969.

Dr. R. F. Boyd, Professor in M... Digital ID: 1223159. New York Public Library

Even cooler however, is that I found this photo of Mrs. Rev. Nelson G. Merry, the first black preacher in the state of Tennessee. I was ecstatic to find this!! I have been researching the Merry family for a friend who is a descendant of Nelson’s brother, Liverpool Napoleon Merry. And, the above-mentioned visit to the cemetery was because I wanted to search for her husband’s grave! My other blog posts about the Merrys can be found here.

From my own personal research, I know that she was born Mary Ann Jones and she was born abt. 12 Jan 1828 to Edmond Jones in Kentucky. She and her husband likely married around 1850 when they first appear in census records together as a 25 year old and 23 year old couple. Though I have not found her in all census’ that she would have lived through, I do know that she and her husband had at least 7 children. Her 77th birthday notice was published in the Nashville Globe 18 Jan 1907.

The wife of the Rev. N. G. Mer... Digital ID: 1232639. New York Public Library

Her picture was published in the book — Buck, D. D. The Progression of the Race in the United States and Canada Treating of the Great Advancement of the Colored Race. Chicago: Atwell Printing and Binding Co, 1907.

Amazing. I can’t wait to see what else I uncover!

Browning Genealogy Database

Today on her blog, Arlene posted a nice review of the Browning Genealogy Database provided through the Evansville Public Library. I was very happy to see this as this database has been one of my best resources! Kalonji’s family is from Evansville, and when I discovered it last year, I had so much fun looking up his family members.

Between the death information and the local history information, I was able to locate so many news items on his family and extended family members. Including, this picture of his mom’s high school graduation picture from Central High School in 1963. The information from the paper tells us that she was in the Future Nurses club, a member of Y-Teens and on the Student Council. Kitty does in fact have the real picture that is represented in the paper, but I did not know of her club memberships until finding this card in the Browning Database.

This database is amazing and I cannot speak well enough about it.

New Membership to WorldVitalRecords.com

Whippee!! I went to WorldVitalRecords today to remind myself how much the membership was and noticed that they had an option that I did not remember seeing before – a monthly payment option – only $5.95/month. I am ecstatic! I’ve had my eye on WVR for a few months and have been wanting to subscribe, but did not want to shell out the whole fee at once. So, I’m quite happy they now offer this and I just signed up! I’ll post any interesting finds I come across.

McClellans of Alabama & Arkansas

Over the past several weeks I’ve been in touch with the coordinator of the McClellan Family Tree DNA Project about our interest in testing some of Kalonji’s DNA lineage. During the course of our exchanges, I learned that he had the McClellan’s of Alabama and Arkansas book done by Bobbie Jones McLane, who is a great-grandchild of William Blount McClellan.

This book is absolutely wonderful! It is full of the research she compiled from family documents, records, etc. and I can’t wait to really delve into it.  She put it together in 1962. On the front cover is a picture of the Idlewilde Plantation in Talladega. I still need to find out where this was located. So.. I’ve got enough McClellan information to keep me  busy for the next year!

In Memorium: Cora Cox Lawhorn

Cora Cox Lawhorn, my great-great grandmother was born approximately March 3, 1876 and died November 23, 1949. As yesterday was the anniversary of her death, I thought I would write a post about her.

I do not know any personal details about Cora in regards to her personality, however, my paternal grandmother, and a first cousin of my grandmother’s, were both named after their grandmother Cora.

Cora was born in North Carolina, likely right in Craven County where she lived, to Robert and Amanda Cox. From census records, I know that she had at least 4 siblings – Moses, Robert Jr., Joseph, and Edward. Cora’s first husband was Samuel Becton Lawhorn whom I am guessing she married around May 28, 1899. Their marriage date is listed in the Lawhorn Family Bible as the last sunday in May of 1899 and that was the date of the last Sunday. Furthermore, this matches very closely to their number of years married in the 1910 census.

Cora and Samuel would have five children that I know of – Samuel Jr., Ida, William, Phelton and George. Family information states that Samuel sr. died around 1916 and in the 1920 census, Cora is in fact widowed. Living next door to her is a man named Will Morton, whom she would eventually go on to marry on December 24, 1924. Cora outlived two of her children (Sam Jr. & Phelton) and upon her death would have known about 13 or so of her grandchildren.

Cora is buried in the family church cemetery, Alum Springs Church, in Dover, Craven County, North Carolina.

As I write this post and review my records, I see that I have not yet located Cora & Sam in the 1900 census, so off I go to look for that.