Some RootsTech Inspiration

Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive, is a keynote speaker at the upcoming RootsTech 2011 conference.   I’m planning a couple of posts within the next 14 days or so around the Internet Archive, so this seemed especially appropriate to post about him.  As he, I too am a librarian, and I am absolutely in love with the Internet Archive.   I only wish I would have a chance to see him speak at RootsTech, but here is a speech he made for a TED talk back in 2008 explaining the establishment and processes behind the Internet Archive.  A must-watch for all those attending RootsTech.

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

How can you can resist reading a fiction mystery book that begins with a family tree?  Last week on a trip to Target I was browsing the paperbacks for a book to read and saw The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.  I’ve been keeping my eye on the run of the movie ever since reading Eastman’s blog post about the movie back in March.   In his post, Eastman mentions that there is a genealogy subtext to the book – a fact very much evident from the first few pages -specifically with the fact that a family tree is displayed.

As Eastman mentions, to solve the mystery the main characters do much research — including spending time researching the ancestors, researching photo & newspaper archives, analyzing old photos, and interviewing the Vanger family members and friends.  For us genealogists, this is sure to be a book you’ll enjoy.

The book is the first in a trilogy; the second book is The Girl Who Played With Fire, and the third, soon-to-be-released book is The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest.  I plan on reading both of the remaining books.   The movie is playing at one of our local theaters so I hope I can get to it soon.

I put a video of the trailer on my blog right sidebar.

Flurry of Activity

I hardly know where to even begin with this post – I have so much going on these days! In the past week, I’ve hardly kept up with all the geneablogsphere activity as I’ve been rather self-absorbed in my newest endeavors.  In the past three weeks or so, I’ve agreed to several genealogy activities.

#1) I will be named as a member of an committee  for a National Endowment for the Humanities grant for digitizing 100,000 pages of newspapers from 1823-1922.   If the grant is awarded then our work begins in Summer 2010 and the committee will help make the decisions on which papers will get digitized.  I have a strong interest and like for historical newspaper research, so when the call was put out, I sent my information in quickly!  Keep your fingers crossed for me.

#2) For this committe, I had to do a resume of my genealogy activities.  While I have a nice professional resume for my day job, I did not have anything that I felt reprsented my genealogy endeavors succinctly.  So, after some browsing and checking out my geneablogger-sphere,  I asked Thomas if he’d let me use his resume template.  He agreed and I created my own 1pg version of a Genealogy Resume.

Taneya’s Genealogy Resume

#3) But, my resume is going to have to be expanded beyond 1pg.  Also recently, I was asked by a local company to come and do a talk on beginning genealogy.  The focus is really to be an informal overview of how I set about my genealogy research and give an overview of some of the basic research approaches, record types etc.  They were willing to pay me, but I turned the money down for I have never done a genealogy-specific presentation before.  I’ve presented plenty for my career, but I also look at it as an opportunity to learn.  This presentation will occur next month.

#4) This week though has been busiest of all, for I agreed to become the new webmaster for the NCGenWeb project…

#5) and also take on site coordinator responsibilities for two additional NC counties- Jones & Onslow.  I already had Martin.  I chose Jones & Onslow because of my Koonce ancestry.   The white Koonce family to which my ancestors belonged to, originated from Jones county.  Additionally, the Koonce family was large, so there were cousins over in Onslow county.   Over the past few months, I’ve begin “collecting Koonces” and have begun the initial seeds of  Koonce surname genealogy study for Koonces everywhere, so  my interest in Jones & Onslow counties are deep-rooted.

I’ve written before about my experience with many of the USGenWeb sites; I applaud the efforts of all those that contribute data for without them, the USGenWeb project would not exist, however, I also would like to see the websites have better organization than many currently do.  So, if I’m going to be involved, I have to reoganize them.  I did this for Blount County, TN & Martin County, NC when I took them on.   Fortunately, the newly elected NCGenWeb Site Coordinator also wanted a revamp of the site, so our interests were well-aligned on this matter.

So, over the past few nights I’ve been busy redoing the NCGenWeb site.  I am rather pleased if I can say so myself – WordPress ABSOLUTELY ROCKS!  We even now have a blog, NCGenWeb News, to which I hope we can post something at least a few times each month.  Click on the picture to visit the site – and show us some love by leaving a comment!

I am very excited to have been able to work with the NCGenWeb board and get it online so quickly.

I also have figured out how I am going to restructure the Onslow County site; again, I’l be using WordPress.  After I get Onslow done,  Jones will probably be organized very similarly.  Here is a sneak peek of what I’m planning for Onslow.

This involvement has made me even more excited about USGenWeb projects in general – we should all make sure we do our part to help out by contributing data whenever we can!  These site coordinators do great jobs in helping us access genealogical information, but I do think it is time for more modern interfaces (generally speaking).  I’m doing my part to move this along as best as I can!

Music Monday: For Once In My Life

I’m writing this post as a pre-published post, but I was just flipping channels and ran across the movie The Temptations.  When I watch this movie, I think of my grandfather Herman.  My favorite scene from the movie is when actor Christian Payton (playing Paul), sings “For Once In My Life.”

At the time, I did not know the song, so asked my parents about it and my mother told me that this song as done by Stevie Wonder was one of her father’s absolute FAVORITES! He would play it repeatedly.  So, this post is for my grandfather Herman.

Music Monday: Spooky

This past week, my cousin was in town and I was able to spend time with her – it was great! “Spooky” is her nickname and we are about 7 years apart. Her mom and my grandmother were sisters and when I was younger, my brother and I used to spend weeks at a time visiting there. She used to come visit us too. Spending time with her this past week has been awesome and it’s made me feel young again.

While she was here, she told me the origin of her nickname, which I didn’t know. Her mother chose the nickname from the popular song “Spooky” written by Daniel Ash. It was popular the year she was born. I found the song online.

Now, before you get to the song, this is the perfect day to post about Spooky being Martin Luther King’s holiday; Spooky was born the very same day he was killed – April 4th, 1968.

Here’s Spooky for your listening pleasure, as sung by Dusty Springfield (in the original, the song was about a girl – she changes it to a boy)

Funeral Service of Alberta Williams

Among my family papers file I have several items about people that I do not know, but who were known by my family members. I am sure many of us have such files too. I was looking through my files this evening and found an obituary for Alberta LaSaine Williams. Alberta was a member of my grandmother’s church in New York, the First Church of God in Christ. The officiating pastor at her funeral was Bishop F. Clemmons, co-pastor was Ithiel Clemmons. I’ve posted about Ithiel before.

alberta

Alberta lived from May 26, 1914 – March 12, 1970.  She was the daughter of Katie Lino and James LaSaine of Georgetown, Georgetown County,  South Carolina.  Alberta moved to New York in 1936 and moved to Winston Salem in 1940 where she married Herbert L. Williams and would have five children.   She moved back to New York in 1951 and joined my grandmother’s church in January of 1964.   Alberta is buried at Bethel A.M.E. Cemetery in Georgetown, SC.   There is a transcription of the cemetery on the Georgetown SCGenWeb page, but Alberta is not listed.

In typical fashion of my grandmother, her funeral program is marked up, but I share it here [click here for the full program] in case it is ever of help to potential family members.

Some background on the LaSaine family:

– in 1910, her parents James & Katie are newlyweds, having gotten married about 1909, and they have their first child, James Jr.  They live on Meeting Street.

– in 1920, Alberta is enumerated with her parents in Georgetown, SC, and siblings James Jr., Brock (??), Thaddeus, and Lydia.  Her father’s occupation is as a chauffer to a private family. They lived on  Meeting Street.

– by 1930, father James has passed, and widow Katie and kids (including Alberta) lives with son James Jr., still on Meeting Street.

It appears Alberta’s sister may still be alive, so I think I will send this to her (or maybe her family that may be living there) for them in case they would like to have the copy.   And, though this is not a Music Monday post, my grandmother noted on the program that the solo sung during her service was hymn “When They Ring These Golden Belles for You & Me.”   And though she didn’t sing it for Alberta, here is Loretta Lynn singing it

Update: I asked my mother about her and she VERY much remembers Sister Williams. She said the whole projects knew her!