Memes

52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy – Week #3 – Free Online Genealogy Tools

With the new year, I am planning to do more blog posts for Amy Coffin’s 52 Weeks series.  This is now week #3 and the topic is “Free Online Genealogy Tools.”  Specifically,

Free online genealogy tools are like gifts from above. Which one are you most thankful for? How has it helped your family history experience?

 

My favorite free online genealogy tool is the USGenWeb Project, hands down.  When I started my genealogy research in 2006, the USGenWeb was a fundamental component of the early successes that I was able to achieve.   The Washington County, NC page contained a very comprehensive listing of deaths from the county that had been compiled by local volunteers.  Due to the extensive coverage (from 1913-1980) and the wealth of information included in the index (names of parents for example), I was able to connect many families together in my tree and obtain vital records information.  Then, as a result of gathering those details, I ordered certificates galore.

Then, because of the benefit I’d gained from the volunteer works of others, I knew I had to find a way to give back and I sought out a way to join the USGenWeb Project myself.  I started by becoming the site coordinator for Blount County, Tennessee.  Though I had no personal research connections with the area, I planned to use my proximity to the Tennessee State Library and Archives as a source of material.   Soon after, I became webmaster for the NCGenWeb, took on several counties with them (including Washington County!) and this summer, became the State Coordinator of the TNGenWeb Project.

I value the USGenWeb’s efforts because in many cases, the site coordinators just wish to provide resources to help others.  One of my fellow coordinators in the NCGenWeb, Lisa Frank,  recently wrote a fantastic blog post about the USGenWeb that is a must read.  Each county is unique and you never know what you may find — this makes it all that much more interesting to peruse.

I am extremely passionate about the mission of the USGenWeb, wish to see it continue to grow as a resource to all, and am proud to be a part of it.  I love browsing and searching pages across the site looking for tidbits about those I research.

Wordless Wednesday:Twitter Topics

What do I talk about on Twitter? Check out this word graphic I created from my twitter postings using Tagxedo.

Tombstone Tuesday: Filling in Our Find-A-Grave Entries

Sunday afternoon I was reading Susan Petersen’s post on her Long Lost Relatives blog about how to make the most use of Find-A-Grave.  It’s a useful article and while I do most of what she discusses, as I read it, I was inspired to create the memorial for my grandmother that just passed away on Mother’s Day.

So, I went ahead and created hers, then realized I did not have memorials for her mother, nor three of her brothers – all have predeceased her.  I was busy Sunday afternoon creating them, then linking the family together.

Now, she and all her brothers are there and linked to their parents, Abraham Lincoln McNair Sr. and Martha Jane Walker McNair and each has pictures added.

I am so glad I’ve done this.   I have more family members to add of course, but it was important that I do her family cluster right away.  With her passing, all of their children have now died.

Part II – There is another part I need to add onto my original post.  I wrote this Sunday, but Monday morning when I logged onto my email I had another tombstone treasure — someone was nice enough to send me a picture of my 2nd great-grandmother’s headstone that he’d taken! This is the headstone for Polly Hood Holloway.  I was tickled pink!

 

I then went over to Find-A-Grave to see if she had a memorial and sure enough someone else had added it and an picture back in November.  See, Susan is right – you must go back to review regularly! Thank you Susan for the inspiration.

My Genea-Wish List

This week Randy’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun is one I could do quite easily without a second thought.  Here’s the task:

1)  Think of the genealogy related wishes you have – what education, database, or information would make your genealogy research dreams come true?  Be specific – as many wishes as you want to list!

2)  Tell us about some of your genea-wishes in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a status or comment on Facebook.

I have one wish:

that every issue of every extant newspaper was fully name-indexed and searchable at the county level

See how easy that was? 🙂

I hope genealogy database vendors are paying attention to this week’s topic – there are some excellent suggestions circulating the blogsphere!

 

Wordless Wednesday: Tree of Life

This weekend we attended an art show and one of my favorite pieces was this one called “Tree of Life.”  I thought it was appropriate for a genealogy post 🙂

Read more about our night on my main family blog.

Tombstone Tuesday: 1,000 Photos!

This weekend I reached a milestone on Find-A-Grave.  Since joining in 2007 I have added over 1,000 photos to the site!  I know there are contributors that do a lot more, but I was pleased to reach this milestone 🙂  Let’s see how long it takes me to get to 2,000.

In addition to the photos I have also contributed 1200 memorials, yet only fulfilled 2 photo requests. Admittedly, I have a hard time with photo requests.  I’m much less inclined to seek out a specific headstone as opposed to taking random pictures of headstones – this is why I greatly appreciate those that do.  However, I am hopeful that someone stumbles across one of the photos I’ve added and it is meaningful to them.

As an active FindAGrave user, I love the site, but sure wish they would make some enhancements. Here’s to hoping.  Meanwhile, I continue to cemetery hop and take as many photos as I can.

 

Tombstone Tuesday: Domenico Aita

On Saturday afternoon, the hubby kidnapped us and decided that we were going to drive around aimlessly for awhile before getting something to eat.  Our driving led us north of Nashville and in nearby Joelton.   Well,  guess what we saw along the way? A church cemetery!   Being the good genealogist that I am, I of course felt compelled to stop and take pictures.

The church is St. Lawrence Catholic Church and as I looked at the tombstones, I saw several with Italian names.  Many of the headstones were beautifully done and dated back to the early-mid 1800s. We were at the cemetery for about 20 minutes, during which time I took about 100 photos! I’m still in the process of transcribing them all to submit to the Davidson County, TNGenWeb site, as well as Find-A-Grave.

However, I wanted to post today about one tombstone in particular – that of Domenico Aita.  There were several Aita family tombstones in the cemetery and he looks to be the progenitor?  Further research will need to be done, but I liked his headstone for it had the name of the city in which he was born – Buja, Italy.  Buja is in the Udine Province region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

Domenico Aita (1869-1921) of Buja, Italy

I wonder if his family descendants know where he is buried and/or are familiar with their homeland?  I wonder if he has remaining family over in Italy?

Wordless Wednesday: Grave Infographics

I love infographics.  Saw this one on iMortuary via Ancestry Insider Blog.

Grave Curiosities
Via: Funeral Flowers at iMortuary.com

Wordless Wednesday: Happy Holidays Stanley

Yesterday, my mom visited her brother’s grave in Sarasota National Cemetery.   The cemetery had decorated all the headstones and she says it was a gorgeous view.  What do you think?

Sarasota National Veteran's Cemetery. December 2010.

Stanley Hines Robinson (1950-2010)

And, here is Stanley’s headstone