Wimberly

This is Why I Never Go To Bed

I knew it was a mistake to get back on the computer after I *said* I was going to bed.  But, I had to check the email and feed readers “one last time.”  Well, now it’s going to cause me to be up long enough to do this blog post, but I couldn’t wait because what I found was too exciting!

Last week I learned of a new resources, a new website of NC  Maps.  I only had an opportunity to briefly consult it, planning to investigate it more in-depth this week.  Well, a researcher today shared the link with the Edgecombe County mailing list and pointed out in her post that the maps allow you to see the locations of properties. She specifically shared the link to at 1905 map.

So, off I go to look at this map and was elated to see my two surnames of interest EXACTLY just like I figured they were — the Wimberly property right next to the McNair property, and those two properties just south of the Battle property! 

I’ve been posting with some frequency lately on my McNair, Wimberly, Battle connections and this is just too perfect.   My 3rd great-grandfather, Rufus Tannahill McNair was likely the slave of Dr. Augustus Harvey McNair.  Rufus married Mariah Wimberly, whose mother was the slave of Kemp Plummer Battle and whose father was probably the slave of Robert Diggs Wimberly.  

I knew from census records that the white McNair, Wimberley and Battle families lived in proximity, but to have this visual is wonderful! Admittedly, I’ve not delved into land records very much for my research – this type of discovery definitely picques my interest.  Thanks so much to the North Carolina State Archives, the Outer Banks History Center, and the University of NC @ Chapel Hill for this wonderful resource!   This is truly made my day. 🙂

True Inspiration!

A couple of days ago, I discovered a new genealogy blog – Robyn’s blog, Reclaiming Kin.  I found her through Randy’s “Best Of the Genea-Blogs” post from Sunday.  Well, yesterday she posted on using court records for research and her experience of looking at records in Edgecomebe County, NC inspired my Tombstone Tuesday post of the gravesite of Kemp Plummer Battle, a resident of Edgecombe County whom owned some of my ancestors.

Well, last night Robyn emailed me stating that she had information to share regarding Kemp.  We spoke on the phone last night and it turned out that she had a great discovery!  The name Kemp P. Battle sounded familiar to her, so she went through some of her files and sent me a wonderful document.

Last year, while visiting the North Carolina State Archives, she’d transcribed some labor contract records from the Freedmen’s Bureau (M1909, Roll #56) which included some records of former slaves of Kemp’s.  The labor contracts were for work in the two years following the Civil War and Robyn explained that some were very formal, others were very casual.  In some cases, family clusters were maintained.

Among the transcription was my 4th great-grandfather, Allen Wimberly! Here is the list she provided:

Joe Battle, Henderson Dorsey, Jason Spicer, Jim Lawrence, York Lawrence, Jim McNear, Allan Wimberly, Alfred Wimberly, Joe Wimberly, Haywood Battle, Lewis Battle, Redding Battle, Norfolk Battle, Isabella Battle, Hardy Battle, Orph Battle, Jason Battle, Sarah Battle, Jerry Battle, Norfleet Dancy, & Illiad Dancey.

In addition to my own Allen Wimberly, some of these names I have seen previously in census records and county cohabitation records. I am not sure how they may connect with my own family, but I certainly need to continue to put these pieces together.  I also note the name “Jim McNear” which may be a variant of my McNair surname — Allen’s daughter Mariah married Rufus McNair; and Rufus I suspect to be a slave of Dr. Augustus Harvey McNair.

I am very excited about this and during the course of our conversation, Robyn stressed the need to take advantage of local Family History Centers for access to records. While I’ve known I need to do this, I have not managed to follow-through with actually ordering any records.  There are two locations in my county and they both are about 45 minutes away from me, but I’m going to have to just go!  So, one of them is open the 3rd Saturday of each month, so I hereby resolve to take a field trip this Saturday to go and place an order for at least two films.

Here is my 1st list of film to work through.  It may take me several months since I will probably order only two at a time, but at least I have some identified right?

Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County): Original wills Ausley, Joseph – Bryan, Thoma Film #1548856
Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County): Original wills Killibrew, John I. – Middleton, S. O. Film #1571217
Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County): Estate records 1748-1917 Barnes, Archelaus – Battle, Joe Film #2069673
Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County):  Estate records 1748-1917 Battle, John – Bell, Bythel Film #2069674
Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County): Estate records 1748-1917 Law, William – Mayberry, Charles Film #2070395
Wills, 1663-1978; estate papers, 1748-1917 (Edgecombe County):  Estate records 1748-1917 Williams, Henry – Winstead, Richard Film #2070963
Will records and index, 1760-1964, with a few marriages (Jones County, NC): Index to wills 1779-1964 Film #386902
Will records and index, 1760-1964, with a few marriages (Jones County, NC): Wills 1760-1842 Film #19228
Will records and index, 1760-1964, with a few marriages (Jones County, NC): Wills 1778-1868 Film #19238 Items 1-3
Pre-1914 cemetery inscription survey, Columbus Co. (NC) Film #882937 Item 11
Pre-1914 cemetery inscription survey, Martin Co. (NC) Film #882938 Item 25
Civil actions concerning slaves and free persons of color (Craven County, North Carolina), 1775-1885 No Film # in record
Craven County, North Carolina, pre-Civil War slave related papers, including petitions for freedom, 1775-1861 Film 2299351 Item 2

This will be quite intersting. Thank you Robyn for an exciting discovery and for inspiration!

Tombstone Tuesday: Kemp Plummer Battle Sr.

This is my first Tombstone Tuesday post and since I had the perfect opportunity to do one, I thought I would.  This is the tombstone of Kemp Plummer Battle Sr.   Kemp was what you would call a “prominent” North Carolinian; he was highly active and involved in many matters of the state, including serving as President of my alma mater, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Kemp is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh, North Carolina next to his wife and other family members.  Last month I created his FindAGrave entry, which was surprising to me that he did not already have one given his social position, and two days ago, my picture request was fulfilled by a FindAGrave volunteer!

Now, why would I interested in Kemp?  I am interested in him and his family because he was the last slaveowner of a branch of my family.   My third great-grandmother, Mariah Wimberly McNair was the daughter of Della Battle and Allen Wimberly.   Della and at least one of her children, were slaves of Kemp’s plantation in Edgecomebe County, North Carolina, that he inherited from his father-in-law,  James S. Battle.  I know that Della was his slave from the wonderful resource of Dr. Barnetta McGhee -White on cohabitation records from North Carolina, Somebody Knows My Name.

I have not yet gotten to the point where I’ve begun to examine family estate and court records (which Robyn describes a perfect example to do so in her recent blog post), but when I do have that opportunity, I want to be clear on all the family members.  Creating a Battle family tree, allows me to do so in order that I am adequately prepared.

Hmmm… would you call it ironic that I went to the University of the man who enslaved my ancestors?  I personally don’t have any misfeelings about this – history was what it was, but at the same time, I do feel connected in a way, to this family.

Wordless Wednesday: Philadelphia Convention Hall

a not so wordless post – this is the hall where one of my ancestral relatives, Dred Wimberly, represented Edgecombe County in the 1900 Republican National Convention.

Source: Harvey, Charles M. Official Proceedings of the Twelfth Republican National Convention. 1900. Google Books. 22 Sept. 2008 <http://books.google.com/books?id=6SIQAAAAYAAJ

Google Books On A Website Near You

Today Google announced on their Book Search Blog that they have developed a series of partnerships in order to more fully integrate Google Books into existing websites.  In the post, they highlight several advantages of this feature including

“For example, suppose you’ve turned to the Books-A-Millionsite to look for a book on the history of your hometown (say, Mountain View, California). When you see a book that looks promising, you can now click on “Google Preview” to browse through the book just as you might in the physical store, without ever having to leave Books-A-Million’s website. “

Whenever browsing participating websites, you just need to look for the Google Preview button and it will open up a window to preview the book online.  There are many different sites participating – bookstores, university libraries, publishers (even Arcadia Publishing – publisher of the Images of America Series), and social book sharing sites.  One of my favorite sites, WorldCat.org is also participating. 

I’ve blogged about Worldcat before: it allows you to locate books in libraries that may be close to you.  When you are looking at a record for a book, if you see the Google Preview button you can begin to browse what is available. 

You can read more about what WorldCat did here.  Right now, it looks like you need to use APIs in order to take advantage of the book preview.  I wonder if there would be any utility in them making an embed code of some type for an individual book-by-book basis?  One could always make a static link to a book, but I like the look of the embedded book. 

I find this particularly of interest as I’ve been spending some time exploring Google Books for my various genealogy interests.  Each month I choose a database to look at more in-depth and this month, Google Books was the one of choice.   During the Genea-Blogger games, my posts from this month on Google Books included:

I have more posts coming this Friday that are not up yet. I’ve written them and set them for pre-publish. I have the Genea-Blogger Games to thank for that!

Negro Week in Edgecombe

The September 20, 1898 issue of the Charlotte Observer featured an article titled: “Negro Week in Edgecombe: Black Republican Convention.”

As was often the case with some of these older articles, this is the overall synopsis– “Not a White Man in the Crowd — This is the set the White population are fussing with and putting in power — Lee Person, a notorious Black politician makes incendiary speeches — Tarboro still has a good police — Northhampton’s negro coroner, who is out for the stuff.”

I came across this article while browsing GenealogyBank tonight and had to read it.  My g-g-g-grandmother was named Mariah WImberly McNair and I suspect the local politician Dred Wimberly was her brother (see previous posts on Dred).  Since this article was about the right time frame as when he was in service, I took a closer look and sure enough he is mentioned. The article notes that although he was seemingly “master of ceremonies” someone else won the NC Senate seat.

[image from GenealogyBank.com]

Then, when I kept reading, I also saw mention of Turner Prince, whom I posted very briefly about last week as there is a community in Edgecombe County named after him, Princeville.  This article notes that Turner served as a state magistrate.

[image from GenealogyBank.com]

I need to read this article more in-depth. This is why I love newspapers!

Connections We Didn’t Know We Had

Before I discovered the wonderful world of genealogy a couple of years ago, my hobby of choice was cross-stitching. I still enjoy stitching, I just don’t do it as much (you can see all the projects I’ve completed here).  Back in 2003, while on a business trip out to San Diego and while there had dinner with a group of stitchers there – one of the ladies I met during that time was a woman I’ll call T.   Since then, we’ve exchanged emails, read each other’s blogs, etc.

Well, a couple of weeks ago, T emails me a genealogy related question.  There is a cross-stitch design called Mother’s Tree that she is wanting to stitch and she’d hit a road block with her 2nd great-grandmother, Elizabeth Daw.   She didn’t know who Elizabeth’s mother had been, but she knew Elizabeth had married a man named John Wimberly. Well, she was internet searching the Wimberly name and up came my genealogy blog. My blog came up b/c I’ve been researching Wimberlys. I have previously posted this, but I have a 3rd great-grandmother named Mariah Wimberly, whom I believe was a slave of a very wealthy Robert Diggs Wimberly of Edgecombe County, North Carolina.

Today, I took about an hour to spend some time trying to help her and I think we made a breakthrough! As she’d given me enough information to start, I was able to find her ancestor in census records and from those, combined with burial records available online, I am at this point about 90% sure we’ve found Elizabeth’s mother. If we are right, her mother would be a Nancy Daw, and Nancy’s mother was Anne Wilson. This would add two more generations to T’s family tree and cross-stitch chart – how cool.

As I was looking further into Elizabeth’s husband John, I came up with a hypothesis on who his father was based on again,  census records and burial records – a Watford Wimberly, who is listed in the census as being from NC — ooh, was this a connection in any way to “my” Wimberly?

So, off I go to Google Watford and one of the pages that is returned is a genealogy from a very detailed an comprehensive Wimberley Family History.  Working my way through the site, according to this researcher, Watford was indeed John’s father as on this site, John is listed as having married a Mary Elizabeth Daw.

More interesting to me is that when I worked my way up through Watford’s ancestry, it appears he is a 8th great-grandson of a William Wimberly of England (1455-1510).  “My” Robert Diggs Wimberly is also listed on this site as a descendant of the same William Wimberly.  Through my own research, I had only identified up to Robert’s grandfather, a George Wimberly.

I have emailed the site owner to learn more about his sources. One thing I often lament when visiting other’s trees is the too frequent lack of sources. This is one reason I value the program that I use for my own genealogies and my website is b/c it makes it very easy to include and show sources.  I have emailed the site owner to find out more, but this is such a cool connection for me and T.   Over the next few weeks, we are going to try and further verify this information, but it is for reasons such as this that I absolutely love the internet!

Rev. Kemp Plummer Battle

One day in December while searching a database I have access to through my job, I came across the following newspaper article from the Chicago Defender. I was doing a search for Dred Wimberly, a black Senator from NC that I suspect is a brother to one of my 3rd great-grandmothers, and this article came up. It came up b/c the Rev. Kemp Plummer Battle was married to one of Dred’s daughters, Annie.

Now, the interesting aspect of this is the Reverend’s name. He’s black. Dred himself was a slave on the Battle Plantation (see previous posts) and it was the WHITE Kemp Plummer Battle that suggested he run for office. The white Kemp Battle was former slavewoner of Dred, and is a former president of my alma mater, the University of NC @ Chapel Hill and Dred was a slave on his family’s plantation. I found it striking that Dred’s daughter would have married a black Kemp Plummer Battle!

Perhaps the Rev. was named after the white Kemp; perhaps the Rev.’s ancestors were too slaves of the Battle plantation. I’ll have to dig deeper and explore this further.

Dred is their son!

I haven’t been blogging much lately, the reason being that I have been quite busy personally. We are going to be moving within the next couple of weeks, so I’ve been prepping for that. Also, I’ve been mostly working on the family tree of an extended family member and have been so engrossed, I’ve just not posted much.

But, I do have something to share today! Thanks to help from a RAOGK volunteer, I received Dred Wimberly’s death certificate. I’ve posted about my efforts to link him to my family and his death certificate confirms that he is indeed the son of Allen & Della Battle Wimberly!!! This adds another link to my chain of evidence and given that Dred shows a very similar living pattern to his parents that my 3rd great-grandmother Mariah does, I am even more convinced that she is part of this family. This is really cool.

Link to Dred’s page on my family genealogy site.

Dred’s Brother?

In my quest to confirm my suspicions on Dred Wimberly, I have another clue. I sent away for his death certificate, but the register of deeds tells me they could not locate it. Hmm.. time to try the NC State Archives. But, they did have the death certificate of whom I suspected to be Dred’s brother, Richard Wimberly.

Richard Wimberly, according to the death certificate, was born about 1859 and his parents were Allen & Della Wimberly. Informant was Dred Wimberly. Well, since my hand searching of the county census records of 1870 show only one Richard Wimberly and he is in the household of Allen & Della, I’m fairly certain this is he. Then, given that Dred was his informant, this adds to my theory that Dred is the son of Allen & Della as well.

I’ve located Richard and his family in the 1900, 1910 and 1920 census records. I’ve located his widowed wife in the 1930 census (he died in 1921). Maybe through his line I can find a living descendant to talk to. I continue to search.